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Moment of Grace was produced in association with The National HIV Story Trust and the play is all the more authentic for it.” – Vada Magazine

5* – LondonTheatre1                                                      5* – Scene Alba
4* – Out News Global                                                     4* – London Living Large
4* – The Reviews Hub                                                    4* – Theatre Weekly
4* – Love London Love Culture                                    4* – Vada Magazine

One of NHST’s ambitions is to keep the stories of HIV/AIDS alive through the arts so when writer Bren Gosling first told us in 2018 he was writing Moment of Grace, a play about London’s first AIDS clinic and its famous opening by Princess Diana in 1987, we were keen to be involved.

Moment of Grace follows three (fictional) characters as they prepare for the Princess’s landmark visit and the impact that the day variously has on them: patient Andrew; Jude, a nurse on the ward; and Essex fireman Donnie. Some of the stories created for the text were drawn from Gosling’s research of the NHST archive.

The play first showcased at the 2018 Bloomsbury Festival where it received rave reviews before securing a run at the Tristan Bates Theatre in London’s West End in June 2020.

Sadly, and as befell so many productions in 2020, covid-19 meant the play could not run as planned. However, the enterprising team quickly moved to create a covid-compliant film in association with the NHST.

The Moment of Grace cast & crew partnered with Tristan Bates Theatre to make the film available for streaming which had the added benefit of being watched by people from around the world.

We are extremely proud to have been involved with this play – and then film – and the amazing reviews it achieved. But most importantly for us was being able to bring the stories of our contributors to audiences in a new way and one which shows the challenges many at that time experienced.

Moment of Grace offers a well-rounded examination on the many different reactions to the AIDS crisis back in 1987 – which has taken on new resonance given the ongoing Covid-19 pandemic.” Love London Love Culture

For better and for worse, the dialogue spoken bears similarities to things said about homosexuality and those suffering from HIV/AIDS today, which makes the piece more relevant and important than ever.” – Theatre Weekly

“It has been immaculately filmed – on line drama is in the nature of things talking heads but for once the limitations this imposes do not matter.” – ReviewsGate

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